Prose Edda finisht !!

Today i added the last missing pages of the prose edda ( i think and hope ) .

I tried to make a page for all the smaller saga’s that get reffered to also .

If everything works like i planned , you should now be able to find these sacred writings in the Prose edda section in the drop down menu or the page of the Prose edda .

I made it also that you can click the links that point to The Poetic Edda or the Heimskringla for faster reference . They should all open in a new tab . I hope this way i can help some of you to find the text you need without have to search 50 webpages that all have some fragments of it .

You will still find some words in the texts that are cursief and bold , those are for me to remind me that i need to look for more info on them . But most are hard to find but i wont give up lol.

If by any chance any of you could provide me with a complete and correct translation of the Hattatal you would have my deepest respect and gratitude .

If you should find some errors please let me know because the reason i made these pages are to help people to find the correct info they seek .

I hope you find these pages usefull and goodnight , i hope you and your kin are in good health and .

Heimskringla

The single surviving page known as the Kringla leaf (Kringlublaðið) is kept in the National and University Library of Iceland. Click on the picture for the Wiki page of Heimskringla .

Today i started with working on the pages of the Heimskringla . Will add all the chapters in the coming week .

Heimskringla (Icelandic pronunciation: ​[ˈheimsˌkʰriŋla]) is the best known of the Old Norse kings’ sagas. It was written in Old Norse in Iceland by the poet and historian Snorri Sturluson (1178/79–1241) c. 1230. The name Heimskringla was first used in the 17th century, derived from the first two words of one of the manuscripts (kringla heimsins, “the circle of the world”).

Heimskringla is a collection of sagas about Swedish and Norwegian kings, beginning with the saga of the legendary Swedish dynasty of the Ynglings, followed by accounts of historical Norwegian rulers from Harald Fairhair of the 9th century up to the death of the pretender Eystein Meyla in 1177. The exact sources of his work are disputed, but included earlier kings’ sagas, such as Morkinskinna, Fagrskinna and the twelfth century Norwegian synoptic histories and oral traditions, notably many skaldic poems. Snorri had himself visited Norway and Sweden. For events of the mid-12th century, Snorri explicitly names the now-lost work Hryggjarstykki as his source. The composition of the sagas is Snorri’s.

The first 2 chapters are already done and available .

  1. Ynglinga Saga
  2. Halfdan the Black Saga