Grímnismál – The Ballad of Grimnir

51. Drunk art thou, Geirröth, | too much didst thou drink,
. . . . . . . . . .
Much hast thou lost, | for help no more
From me or my heroes thou hast.

52. Small heed didst thou take | to all that I told,
And false were the words of thy friends;
For now the sword | of my friend I see,
That waits all wet with blood.

53. Thy sword-pierced body | shall Ygg have soon,
For thy life is ended at last;
The maids are hostile; | now Othin behold!
Now come to me if thou canst!

54. Now am I Othin, | Ygg was I once,
Ere that did they call me Thund;
Vak and Skilfing, | Vofuth and Hroptatyr,
Gaut and Jalk midst the gods;
Ofnir and Svafnir, | and all, methinks,
Are names for none but me.

King Geirröth sat and had his sword on his knee, half drawn from its sheath. But when he heard that Othin was come thither, then he rose up and sought to take Othin from the fire. The sword slipped from his hand, and fell with the hilt down. The king stumbled and fell forward, and the sword pierced him through, and slew him. Then Othin vanished, but Agnar long ruled there as king.

51. Again the poem returns to the direct action, Othin addressing the terrified Geirröth. The manuscripts show no lacuna. Some editors supply a second line from paper manuscripts: “Greatly by me art beguiled.” 53. Ygg: Othin (“The Terrible”). The maids: the three Norns. 54. Possibly out of place, and probably more or less corrupt. Thund: “The Thunderer.” Vak: “The Wakeful.” Skilfing: “The Shaker.” Vofuth: “The Wanderer.” Hroptatyr: “Crier of the Gods.” Gaut: “Father.” Ofnir and Svafnir: cf. stanza 34.

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Analyses Analysis Bellows Corona Dutch Edda Edda's Eiriksmal Frigg Frigga Goddess Eir Hakonarmal Har Harald Fairhair Havamal Havamal 2 Havamal 4 Havamol Heathen Heathens Heimdallr Heimskringla High one Hávamál Lokasenna Mimir Nine worlds Odin Petition Poetic Edda Prophecy of the Seeress Prose Edda Ragnarök Sacred text Skaldskaparmal Snorri Sturluson Study The saying of Har Toughts Valhalla Vanaheim Viking Vindheim Völuspá Yggdrasil